Tony Whyton

Tony-Whyton-portrait

Tony Whyton is Professor of Jazz Studies at Birmingham City University (BCU). His critically acclaimed books ‘Jazz Icons: Heroes, Myths and the Jazz Tradition’ (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and ‘Beyond A Love Supreme: John Coltrane and the Legacy of an Album’ (Oxford University Press, 2013) have sought to develop cross-disciplinary methods of musical enquiry. As an editor, Whyton published the Jazz volume of the ‘Ashgate Library of Essays on Popular Music’ in 2011 and continues to work as co-editor of the Jazz Research Journal (Equinox). In 2014, he founded the new Routledge series ‘Transnational Studies in Jazz’ alongside BCU colleague Dr Nicholas Gebhardt. Gebhardt and Whyton also edited ‘The Cultural Politics of Jazz Collectives: This Is Our Music’ (Routledge) in 2015, a collection that explores the ways in which musician-led collectives offer a powerful model for rethinking jazz practices in the post-war period.

From 2010-2013, Whyton was Project Leader for the ground-breaking HERA-funded Rhythm Changes: Jazz Cultures and European Identities project (www.rhythmchanges.net), where he led a consortium of 13 researchers working across 7 Universities in 5 countries.  He is currently the Project Leader for CHIME, a 3-year JPI-Heritage Plus funded project that explores the relationship between jazz festivals and heritage sites (www.chimeproject.eu).

Tony Whyton Announced as Keynote Speaker

 

Tony-Whyton-portraitThe organisers are delighted to announce that the keynote address will be given by Professor Tony Whyton.

Tony Whyton is Professor of Jazz Studies at Birmingham City University (BCU). His critically acclaimed books ‘Jazz Icons: Heroes, Myths and the Jazz Tradition’ (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and ‘Beyond A Love Supreme: John Coltrane and the Legacy of an Album’ (Oxford University Press, 2013) have sought to develop cross-disciplinary methods of musical enquiry. As an editor, Whyton published the Jazz volume of the ‘Ashgate Library of Essays on Popular Music’ in 2011 and continues to work as co-editor of the Jazz Research Journal (Equinox). In 2014, he founded the new Routledge series ‘Transnational Studies in Jazz’ alongside BCU colleague Dr Nicholas Gebhardt. Gebhardt and Whyton also edited ‘The Cultural Politics of Jazz Collectives: This Is Our Music’ (Routledge) in 2015, a collection that explores the ways in which musician-led collectives offer a powerful model for rethinking jazz practices in the post-war period.

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Call For Papers

Continental Drift: 50 Years of Jazz from Europe

16th and 17th of July, 2016

A two-day conference at Edinburgh Napier University, UK, in association with the Edinburgh Jazz & Blues Festival.

The organisers seek proposals for papers (to be delivered as a 20×20” slide-based presentation) based on two central themes that will function as stimulus for panel discussions:

  1. Key factors in the development of jazz in Europe.
  2. Moving forward – the future of jazz in Europe.

We intend to include a broad range of interdisciplinary perspectives around these topics including but not limited to historical, analytical, philosophical, economical, cultural, political, and pedagogical viewpoints. We welcome proposals from any disciplinary background.

Conference proceedings will take two main forms:

  1. Each presenter will be invited to submit an article based on their presentation which will be published as part of an edited collection – details TBC.
  2. The event will be filmed and released as an open-access online resource.

Proposals should include the following details:

Presenter Name
Institutional affiliation (if appropriate)
Email address
Title of paper
300-word abstract

Please send your abstract to continentaldriftconference@gmail.com by Tuesday the 1st of March 2016. You will be notified of the outcome by Monday the 14th of March.

Dr Haftor Medbøe, Dr Zack Moir, and Prof. Chris Atton
Conference Organisers